Comics : Daily Bugle #3

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This story is part of a Lookback Series: Filling Gaps

This review was first published on: 2009.

Background...

The presence of the Daily Bugle staff has gradually diminished over the years. So it's really refreshing to see a limited series devoted solely to them. This is not a Spider-Man story. It's not even a Peter Parker story as he's barely around. This is story about JJJ, Joe "Robbie" Robertson, Ben Urich, Ken Ellis, Betty Brant and the rest of the staff as they chase the stories of the day on the streets of New York.

In Detail...

"Deadline"
Daily Bugle #3
Feb 1997 : SM Title
Editor:  Tom Brevoort
Writer:  Paul Grist
Pencils:  Karl Kerschl, Phil DePages
Inker:  Al Milgrom, Chris Ivy, Greg Adams
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Issue
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Articles: Betty Brant, Glory Grant, Jameson, J. Jonah, Robertson, Joe "Robbie"

With Betty Brant missing, JJJ gets his best reporters to track down her last known whereabouts. Brant finds herself at Food Factory with Tommy Fude pointing a gun at her. He wants to know where the financial accounts of the restaurant are as he can't find them anywhere and they weren't in Betty's appartment. There's something suspicious with the accounts which involve Hall, a crime boss from the first issue. The combined Bugle staff figure out that Betty is at Food Factory and the police surround the restaurant. Betty tries to convince Tommy that it's not too late. A shot is fired inside. I won't say what happens but obviously Betty doesn't die.

In General...

There's emotional resonance to the Food Factory story but litte investigative reporting actually occurs compared to the Urich and JJJ plots in issues 1 & 2 respectively. Essentially stuff just happens to Betty and that's how she gets her story. There's nothing inherently illogical with the way it unfolds but one would expect a main plot that gives Betty a more active role where she would've had to figure out something.

Overall Rating...

4 webs for the entire series. Sure it has no effect on Spider-Man continuity but that doesn't mean you shouldn't read it. The writing and art are both excellent and mesh perfectly together. The choice to use black and white art is striking and original. It's a very well told story that never drags with some chuckles and intelligence.