Comics : Marvel Heroes (UK Magazine) #19

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This story is part of a Lookback Series: British History

This review was first published on: Oct 2011.

Background...

In our opening story from Marvel Heroes (UK Magazine) #19, a research-lab artificial intelligence was destroyed.

This story has no reason to be linked with that tale at all. But it is.

In Detail...

"The Big B.O.S.S."
Marvel Heroes (UK Magazine) #19 (Story 2)
Review (No SM)
Writer:  James Peaty
Artist:  Gary Erskine
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In story two, Elektra (in Tokyo) is hired by a ninja clan to get rid of a rival boss. However, the B.O.S.S. turns out to be an A.I. computer/robot system which the clan themselves created, but which has become self-aware as a side-effect of the events of the first story.

Elektra "gets rid of" the A.I. by donating it to Hank's colleague, from the first story in Marvel Heroes (UK Magazine) #19.

Apparently, this replaces much of the work which was originally lost in the first half of the tale. Presumably in the same way that somebody who was writing a novel that is lost can have their worked replaced by being gifted a manuscript for a different novel. Hey, all books are the same, all research projects are the same. Right?

In General...

Now let's be clear about this. As far as we can tell, the A.I. that Elektra encounters in part two is completely and utterly unrelated to the A.I. from the first story.

Furthermore, there is no reason to suggest that Elektra has any interest in A.I. Nor is there anything to suggest that she is friends with Beast, or that she has any association with the research lab he was visiting.

So I can't for the life of me imagine why a hired assassin who hardly gives a damn about human life would want to ship fifty tons of semi-retarded robot brain (that she has been hired to eliminate) all the way to the U.S to gift to a person she doesn't know.

Overall Rating...

As so often is the case in this title, or indeed in pretty much every story to come out of the UK in the last five years, this story is facile, contrived and unsatisfying. The attempt to link the two part-tales is tragically unsuccessful, and shrieks of pure desperation.

One sad web.